5 Nuggets Social Fresh 2010

Social Fresh Tampa - 5 Nuggets I Still UseLast February I attended Social Fresh Tampa at the last minute because it was local, inexpensive and didn’t appear to be a MLM event.  Thank God!

As I prepare for the 2011 tour to pass through Tampa tomorrow (though some training started today), I thought I’d share 5 nuggets I took from last year’s event and have used in the past 12 months.

1. Twitter and Facebook Panel

Nugget: How do you handle 24 hours of the day?  Are you there when they talk about you?

Over the past year I have had so many instances managing a large social presence where activities happen from 5pm-9am, when no one is in the office.  Planning and building these responses by more than one person are the only way you can sustain a 24/7 presence on the web for your brand.

2. Maggie Fox – Social Media Group – runs Ford’s social media

Nugget: Earned media is amplified by paid media which is syndicated through owned media

I’ve “borrowed” Maggie’s nugget in presentations, designing marketing plans even over beers with my neighbors in the driveway.  When you approach your presence on the web respecting what you own and don’t own, you give more credence to those who want to talk about you.   You’re playing on their turf after all.

3. Branding within Social Media Panel – Tampa Bay Rays

Nugget: Managing your reputation when you don’t control it

Much like Maggie’s approach to what you own and don’t own, this panel shed light on how to manage your brand when you own, but don’t have control.  There are many franchise or multi-location online marketing scenarios where there are multiple owners.  In these situations, knowing how to achieve your goals with modified rules is critical.

4. The Social Web, Crisis Response and Reputation Rejuvenation – presented by General Motor’s Director of Social Media

Nugget: You need to be engaged prior to a crisis

I have actively taken his advice and worked hard to engage and build up my company’s reputation not only because it’s the right thing to do, but also because when we do maker a misstep I hope we’ll be afforded some leniency to correct and recover with a fatality.

5. Corporate Blogging Panel

Nugget: Removal criteria: Vulgar, Personal, Not germane

I know it seems rather basic but these 3 simple criteria truly sum up how to approach the haters, trolls and general angry people in this world online.  We have a very high bar for removal, but if you take a business issue and make it into a personal attack, you’re not playing fair.

What Did You Learn?

What about you?

Did you learn anything last year that you can say you used in the past 12 months?

Let me know if so.

Lights! Camera! Satisfaction!

PRSA PresentationVideo is good!

But you don’t need to be scared of it.

I use it here on this site and I use it a ton during the day in my Clark Kent role.

If you want to add video to your marketing campaign, this presentation may be just right for you, Integrating Video Into Your Communications Plan.

Details

Whether you are focusing on business or personal, I’m going to cover the basics for those who play every role in their company to where video should go in your marketing strategy.

PRSA Tampa Bay

Thanks to the Tampa Bay chapter of the PRSA for inviting me to share with their members for this event.

But it’s not limited to members, so join us for breakfast next week!

SchneiderMike Interview

SchneiderMike is one smart guy.  I researched his work before I asked him to be a part of my Social Fresh Tampa interview series and I was impressed.  He is a guy who gets it and shares what he knows.  Can’t wait to hear him speak in a few weeks.


Your Background

SchneidermikeMark Regan: Tell me a little about your background and how you came into your current role as Director Digital Incubator at allen & gerritsen.

SchneiderMike: I started as an application developer. I built giant operational, CRM and analytics database applications for big companies in the pharmaceuticals, shopping, healthcare technology, retail and consumer packaged goods spaces. During that time I got pretty intimate with Oracle, Cognos, Business Objects and also open source technologies. Somehow

I ended up building analytics and web technology groups for a big Boston ad shop. I stayed there for four years and then left to help build the digital group for allen & gerritsen .

Stakeholders

Mark Regan: With a focus being put on location-based and local marketing recently, how do you think a stakeholder should choose where to focus?

SchneiderMike: They should consider their goals and resources first and foremost. Are they looking to acquire new customers or reward loyal customers? Are they looking for more engagement? Do they want to perform spectacle? Its hard to accomplish all three in one tactic. Focus on creatively engaging customers and then choose a platform that fits.

Location-Based

Mark Regan: Your recent blog post about Foursquare’s need for a hierarchy was dead on. How have you been able to manage multi-location businesses with such tools?

SchneiderMike: We don’t let a lack of tools stop us. We know the space is evolving and we are vocal about where we’d like to see it go. In other words, we use people hours now. The people at foursquare have made it easy for us by investing time on their end while tools are evolving.

Mark Regan: How do you think small businesses should take advantage of location-based social networks like Foursquare, Gowalla and Facebook Places? How can they gain a competitive edge with them?

SchneiderMike: First they should pay attention to all of the things that are happening to them on these networks. Becoming familiar with the content will give them an opportunity to learn who likes and does not like their product. First and foremost, listen to these people on foursquare, Yelp, Google and Facebook who are talking to them about their products and services.

Next, they should be going big with Groupon-like deals of 50% off or more to attract the attention of a very vocal early adopter set who will pass on the information. They can be creative about how many checkins it takes to unlock the deal and they can cut it off when they want to quit. That’s a good start.

Bonus Questions

Mark Regan: What is your favorite online marketing/social media toy of the day?

SchneiderMike: I really want a Go Pro Camera. Video is the thing I want to do most but seem to make the least time for lately. I’m also into using the iPad as an instrument.

Mark Regan: Any fun plans while you’re here in Tampa?

SchneiderMike: I’ll probably have a couple of beers with Manny and Johnny. Seriously though, I am planning to have dinner and drinks with the attendees of Social Fresh and get a sense for the Tampa social media scene. I’m open to ideas. I do really want to try some famous Cigar City beers.

Contact

Mark Regan: Thanks SchneiderMike! I’m excited to welcome you to Tampa on February 22nd as part of Social Fresh Tampa.  How can people find out more about you and connect with you?

SchneiderMike: The best way for people to reach me is to tweet me on twitter @schneidermike or send an email to schneidermike at a dash g dot com.

If you want to learn more about what I am thinking about, you can read my blog, Digital Before Digital at schneidermike.com although I’ve slowed down a bit on blogging while I’m writing Location-based Marketing For Dummies with Aaron Strout.

Thanks for reaching out to me Mark, I’m excited to come to Tampa.

Zena Weist Interview

Zena’s joining a full line-up of speakers in this month’s Social Fresh Tampa conference.  In my interview with her, she stresses the 1-to-1 relationship of social media and a little more “doing” and less “trying” by the brand owners.


Your Background

JohnWeist, ZenaWeist & ZachCobb

JohnWeist, ZenaWeist & ZachCobbphoto credit: westsidestudiokc.com

Mark Regan: Tell me a little about your background and how you came into your current role as H&R Block’s Social Media Director.

Zena Weist: Direct marketing has been something I’ve been drawn to since college. I enjoyed advertising, which was my emphasis, but I craved that back and forth brand discussion with customers. When I was working on my MBA in direct marketing, I was taking a Henry Bloch entrepreneurial course where I met with a digital start-up CEO. His company was selling bulk computer components on discussion boards (this was before the web and mass use of email). Yes, I’m old.

When I saw the back and forth dialogue via the internet, I was hooked. The digital start-up hired me. My first online marketing role had me dive into newsgroups and forums back in 1994. We rolled out a web site in late fall of 1994. I knew the web was my professional home. I thrive on the 1:1 interaction.

My first exposure to a velvet-roped online community was with Hallmark in 2004. Blogger outreach started in 2006 for me. I began developing the first social media roadmap for my company, Embarq, a spin-off of Sprint, in 2007. I was hired by H&R Block in January, 2010. The Social Media Director role was newly created by the CMO.

Agency – Client

Mark Regan: You’ve been on both the agency and client side of online marketing, how would you compare the two relative to social media adoption/implementation?

Zena Weist: In general, on the adoption/implementation front I think agencies and clients are both in the early growth stage of social media. Before you say, “but Zena get your head out of the Tampa sand,” please give me a paragraph or two to explain.

There are brand and agency social media examples we hold up as best in class. They just aren’t the norm, they are the exception. So now how can we all help each other power forward through to shift social media methods from “sitting at the kids table to moving up to the adult table.”

For me, the agency should already be integrating social media into any marketing or communications project from the onset. I’d like to see all agencies move away from bolting on social media tactics after the pitch is fully baked. What I am seeing that is working really well is when the agency plays that much needed third-party-social-media- strategy-advocate role. They help their clients build their social media roadmap for incorporating social media tools into all customer touchpoints. A majority of what I’m seeing from agencies is integrating social media into marketing communication plans. To me this is still fairly project specific and I’m looking forward to the industry maturing with more and more strategic consulting and long-term planning.
From my experience, client side social media has to be more holistic to succeed. The brand needs to weave social media methods into business processes, not bolt-on social media in a “toe-dipping, let’s try this out” approach. Given consumers’ expectations, for brands there is no try in social, there’s only do. Let’s help each other do social business well together. Let’s lift each other up. (And yes, I’m a huge Yoda fan.)

Stakeholders

Mark Regan: How have you approached the ROI-focused stakeholders who discount social media as not worth the investment?

Zena Weist: In order to get my peers’ and my executives’ attention, I have to speak their ROI language and use their metrics or I won’t be taken seriously. My team has acquisition, share of voice, brand awareness and impression goals just like our traditional marketing and corporate communication teams do.

Competition

Mark Regan: I imagine that H&R Block’s main competitors are local, private tax professionals more than other multi-location businesses. Does size give you an advantage on the social web or is it a liability?

Zena Weist: In this case, I think size doesn’t really matter. What matters is if you are meeting customer expectations online. Are you listening, responding and sharing WHERE your customers/prospects are online? If you aren’t, you aren’t meeting customer expectation and they will be vocal about their disappointment and seek out your competition.

Bonus Questions

Mark Regan: Bonus: What is your favorite online marketing/social media toy of the day?

Zena Weist: Ok, my favorite public community right now is Quora. I’m addicted to it. I’m more of a lurker than anything right now. I’m trying to move into more of a contributor-role but I catch myself spending hours (at night) reading up on social trends, tech news and my personal interests.

Mark Regan: Bonus: Any fun plans while you’re here in Tampa?

Zena Weist: I ❤ Tampa and I’m not just saying that because Social Fresh is in Tampa. I try to get there at least every other year. The vibe is relaxed and fun. My family loves the friendly folks, warm weather and beaches. This quick trip, I’m hoping to get a chance to go to the ocean for a bit and enjoy the warm weather as I’m landlocked and freezing in Kansas City.

Contact

Mark Regan: Thanks Zena! I’m excited to welcome you to Tampa on February 22nd as part of Social Fresh Tampa. How can people find out more about you and connect with you?

Zena Weist: Zena (@ZenaWeist) is an iWorkingmom who’s passionate about her four fun-loving kids, one adorable husband, customer advocacy, autism awareness, craft beers, red wine and all things chocolate; therefore she’s into running as well :-). Zena blogs a bit about all this at Nothing but socNET and she is a founding member of the Kansas City Chapter of the Social Media Club.

Corey Creed Interview

Corey’s going to be laying it all out in a few weeks at Social Fresh Tampa talking about Facebook, social media and tons more. I had a chance to talk to him about his background and the work-life balance of the social web.


Your Background

Corey Creed
Mark Regan: Tell me a little about yourself and your background.

Corey Creed: For most my life, I’ve done public speaking and training. I’ve also done a lot of project management and instructional design. But more recently, I’ve been using those skills with Internet marketing and social media. Here’s how it all came about…

I grew up outside of Boston and then moved to New York for ten years. In 2002, I moved back to Massachusetts for one year. I had a hard time finding work, so ended up helping a friend with his e-commerce business. In three months, we tripled his sales. But it was way too cold in Massachusetts, especially for my wife who is originally from Daytona, FL!

So in 2003, my wife and I moved to North Carolina and started HIPPO which has two parts to it. HIPPO Inc sells products via e-commerce to the hospitality industry. Hippo Internet Marketing did SEO, AdWords, and more for clients. In 2007, we stopped taking clients and started teaching Internet marketing seminars. In 2010, we stopped teaching seminars and started moving our content online instead.

In 2011, I also started working with Social Fresh as the Training Director.

Time Management

Mark Regan: You seem to have your time spread out a lot from clients, training, speaking and your own personal brand.  How do you manage the sometimes competing obligations?

Corey Creed: I’m all about time management.  Over the years, I’ve fired almost all of my clients.  The few remaining are the best ones.  I enjoy working with them and we each respect each other’s time.  I regularly prioritize and keep my inbox down to zero several times per week.  I move things to my to do list and work on one thing at a time in priority order.

Oh, and I have three monitors.  That helps.  I only work 40 hours per week or less.  I spend time with my wife and on other non-profit activities outside of work.

Fads

Mark Regan: What social media tactic do you see people jumping into too quickly?  and what should they do more of in advance?

Corey Creed: I see people jumping into the “shiny new things” way too quick.  We all need to get better at Facebook.  It’s good to stay somewhat informed of new things and to know what’s out there.  But we’ve got to get better at what we have now.  Focus on the opportunities that exist today and do them better.

Content is King

Mark Regan: Regarding social media, if you could make a business owner/stakeholder do one thing that they always don’t want to do, what would it be?

Corey Creed: They almost always need to become better writers.  Content is king, but that’s just the beginning.  The better we get at writing in all its various forms, the more success we’ll have.  Good writing is not easy, but all marketers and business owners should work at it and stop trying to outsource it.  It’s that important.

LBSNs

Mark Regan: How should small businesses take advantage of location-based social networks like Foursquare, Gowalla and Facebook Places? How can they gain a competitive edge with them?

Corey Creed: This one is tricky.  The adoption rate of these services is not that impressive yet.  Small businesses have a lot to do.  It may not be worth their time to put a lot of effort into this.  At the same time, being an early adopter can get you extra business.  Give it a shot and see what happens.  But don’t waste too much time on it.

Bonus Questions

Mark Regan: What is your favorite online marketing/social media toy of the day?

Corey Creed: For seeing what others do when they visit my site, my favorite cool new tool is Mouseflow.  My every day tools are Microsoft Outlook, Google Chrome, BlogJet, Digsby & Hootsuite.

Mark Regan: Bonus: Any fun plans while you’re here in Tampa?

Corey Creed: Not really, Jason Keath has me working the entire first day of Facebook training.  Also, I’ve got to keep up on my own business at the same time.  But I do hope it’s warm that week.  I hate the cold!  🙂

Contact

Mark Regan: Thanks Corey!  I’m excited to welcome you to Tampa on February 22nd as part of Social Fresh Tampa.  How can people find out more about Hippo Internet Marketing and connect with you?

Corey Creed: You can find most everything I do at www.CoreyCreed.com and www.HippoIMT.com.

Thanks for the opportunity to be interviewed.  It’s nice meeting you and I’m really excited to meet the various social media and Internet marketing people in sunny Tampa!  See you at Social Fresh!

Tampa is 25th in the US for Tech Jobs? Really?

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=17863968&server=vimeo.com&show_title=0&show_byline=0&show_portrait=0&color=00ADEF&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Note: This video was shot using a Flip video MinoHD 8GB camcorder (Amazon affiliate link) and a Fat Gecko Double Knuckle Camera Mount (Amazon affiliate link). Boo-Yah!

My Flip is awesome! Though I wish I had the 3rd generation version which includes image stabilization. The Fat Gecko is wicked. Use it in or out of your car, snowboards, mountain bikes, bike helmets. I love it!


Transcription

I’ve had this video transcribed below for those who prefer to read rather than listen or watch. The transcription provided by me.

Hey everybody! Mark Regan here. I recently read where Moody’s listed Tampa as one of the top 25 hubs in technology.

I was born and raised here through high school. Left for about 15 years, never planning to come back, living in cities like RTP, North Carolina, Atlanta and Silicon Valley, cities in metropolitan areas that really have an infrastructure and an ecosystem built around supporting technology companies and technology people.

Tampa doesn’t have any of that. It might have a little bit in the biosciences areaout near USF. But it isn’t in any way, supportive hardware, software technology services—anything that is closer to what I’m interested in.

So they call it a ‘technology hub’ is really doing a disservice to those other cities and Moody’s really should’ve stopped their count at whatever point the technology hubs is really stopped turning in into the cities with technologies and really just started to be a top 25 list for some arbitrary purpose of calling them 25 cities.

If you disagree with me, let me know. Leave me some comments below.

Maybe there’s something here I don’t know or something is beginning ready to happen but to call it a ‘technology hub’ doesn’t work in my mind. I live here now and I plan to live here for this foreseeable future and I would love to be wrong but I just don’t see it.

Anyway, let me know in the comments below. Later

Dr. Nate Interview

Social media in a conservative industry?

In this week’s interview of Online Marketing experts here in the Tampa Bay area, I had the chance to hook up with Dr. Nathan Bonilla-Warford (Dr. Nate), owner of Bright Eyes Family Vision Care in the Westchase area of Tampa.  He sprang onto the Tampa scene early this year with…

I’ll just let him tell the story.


Your Background

Dr. Nathan Bonilla-Warford Interview

Mark Regan: Tell me a little about your background and how you came into your current incarnation of optometrist and social media evangelist..

Dr. Nate: I’ve always been a little bit techy when thinking about a career, I considered basic science, but was concerned about not having enough person-to-person interaction. After considering lots of fields that would be science/tech based yet involve daily working with people, I settled on Optometry. I have been extremely happy with my choice.

I have also been interested in “social media” from the early 1990s in the form IRC, usenet, and MUDs and even without video, audio, or graphics beyond ASCII art, I was impressed with how well the internet could unite people independent of geography. I worked for AOL for awhile after college and before optometry school. Once I became a business owner, it was a no-brainer to use these tools to make connections and market my “real” skill of eye and vision care.

Foursquare Day – April 16th

Mark Regan: We came to know each other through your fame in naming April 16th (4/16) as Foursquare Day.  How has this international level of fame changed your Westchase business?  Were there any downsides?

Dr. Nate: Well, Foursquare Day was great. I basically just got lucky – I had a simple idea and ran with it. Lots of other people got excited about it and because of that I was on TV, in the paper, and mentioned in lots of blogs and websites around the world. I met lots of great folks.

People now find out about my practice via foursquare, but even more importantly it opened doors that lead to speaking appearances at national meetings and a paying gig blogging about social media and the eye care industry. The only real downside was that I basically didn’t sleep for three weeks while not cutting back on my day job. Working during the day, blogging at night. It was brutal.

Local Online Marketing

Mark Regan: With respect to local online marketing, what should more owners use to drive their business?  I’m thinking, review sites, directories, SEO, social media, location-based marketing, etc.  But you may have others.

Dr. Nate: Small business owners are busy people and they can’t simply tell “marketing” to do things. I’m not saying they have to do everything themselves, but they should educate themselves enough about social media so that they can intelligently make choices about what to do, what to delegate and what to outsource.

I think we are at the point now where every local business should have a Facebook page, even if it is updated less frequently. A blog really matters, both for the customer education and the SEO value, but it requires more time and attention. Claiming and monitoring review sites are important, but I think that the demographics of Tampa Bay are such that a business should limit the amount of time put in.

Mark Regan: I’m guessing the typical optometrist considers their market potential to be a 25-mile radius around their office.  What would you say to these folks to open their eyes beyond that limitation?

Dr. Nate: I think that the average optometrists actually thinks it is smaller than 25-mile, maybe more like 10. It is interesting, though, because I have patients that come from Gainesville, Bradenton, Sebring, etc. They come because I have special skills such as computer vision syndrome and children’s vision and they find me via the internet.

So when I talk to other eye doctors, I encourage them to think about what sets them apart and then totally own that niche. Claim that area and dominate it. For example, I want to be the THE EYE GUY to the Tampa Bay tech scene. The fact that I just got published in Mashable is huge, even though obviously most readers aren’t in my neighborhood.

Healthcare Industry

Mark Regan: Do you feel businesses in the healthcare space have a disadvantage over others due to legal issues, liability, regulations when it comes to exploiting the latest and greatest in online marketing strategies?

Dr. Nate: I do a podcast called Peripheral Vision with a friend about social media for eye care professionals. We talk about this all the time. Yes, health care does have few disadvantages. Some of these are state and federal laws that limit what can be said and what kind of information can be released.

But that isn’t really the biggest hurdle. Most health care professionals are very conservative and are used to have a lot of control over everything. Social media is new and it feels like giving up control of information and image to others. What many don’t realize is that they’ve already lost control – they just don’t know it yet – and embracing social media is a way to regain control.

Location-Based Social Networks

Mark Regan: Bonus question: What are your thoughts on location-based social networks like Foursquare, Gowalla and Facebook Places? How do you see them helping businesses?

Dr. Nate: Well, I remember when I was being interviewed a year ago and was asked what I thought was going to be big in 2010. I said location-based services, but I had no idea how white-hot it was going to get – for me personally or the the concept. However, a very small percentage of people, I think hovering around 5% use these networks.

Facebook has the opportunity to explode that number, but from a business owner perspective they’ve totally botched the roll out in a really disappointing way.

Nevertheless, I think businesses should take advantage of the LBS networks, because even if a small percentage of people use them, it gives businesses one more way generate content and interest. It remains to be seen if LBS ever becomes standard.

Contacting You

Mark Regan: Thanks Dr. Nate!  How can people find out more about how you use social media in your optometry office and connect with you?

Dr. Nate: You are totally welcome. Thanks for being a Patient Spotlight for me. I love to spread the word about social media. First, I host a regular social media chat for the Westchase Area Business Association at my office. People can find out more on the Facebook page. They can also read more on my blog, Bright Eyes News, or find me on Facebook or Twitter.